A Nourishing DIY Facial Scrub For Radiant Winter Skin

With spring just around the corner, it’s time to bid farewell to icicles, skiing, and long evenings sipping hot cocoa next to the fire. It’s also time to bid farewell to biting winds, subzero temperatures, and the 24/7 blast of oh-so-dry central heating – not to mention all the skin woes that come right along with these “winter wonders.”

They might be wonderful to see and enjoy (if you’re a fan of cold temps), but they’re anything but wonderful for your skin.

Months of winter weather can leave you with skin that’s dry, rough, and chapped – all of which can seriously dull your glow.

And it’s not just your pretty face that’s at stake here. Winter weather can even be bad for the health of your skin. That’s right – skin that’s dry is more prone to redness, itchiness, and irritation. And if that dry skin begins to crack? It can lead to the risk of bacteria getting into the skin, causing further irritation.1

Facial Scrub | Princeton NutrientsAll of this can make you long for gentle breezes, soft rain, and the return of dewy, springtime skin. Well … we’re almost there.

But there are things you can do to renew your skin now. How about a rejuvenating homemade facial scrub?

A skin-pampering facial scrub will rid you of dry winter skin, restoring skin’s moisture, so you can gear up for spring. You’ll be left with a complexion that’s soft, supple, radiant, and most importantly – protected – to get you through the waning days of winter.

Moisturizing Facial Scrub For Winter Skin

This recipe is a miracle worker for skin that’s been battered by winter weather. It uses nourishing ingredients to exfoliate, moisturize, and soothe. So, what makes this facial scrub so great?

Coconut Oil:

Facial Scrub | Princeton NutrientsThe oil from the humble coconut has been hailed in recent years as a do-it-all remedy. Not only can you cook with it, you can also use it to condition your hair, shave your legs, and soften your cuticles. And yes – those benefits extend to the skin as well. Studies have found that coconut oil is an effective and safe way to hydrate mild to moderately dry skin.2

Olive Oil:

The Mediterranean diet, which is rich in olive oil, is known to have a myriad of health benefits, including good heart health.3 Well, it turns out olive oil is good for your skin, too. Topical application of olive oil may help reduce redness, irritation, and itchiness.4

Honey:

Since skin is particularly dry in the winter, it’s important to take your hydration game to the next level. That’s where honey comes in. Sure, putting honey on your face may sound sticky, but it’s worth it. Not only will honey deeply moisturize thirsty skin, it also promotes youthfulness, helps slow wrinkle formation, balances skin pH, and it helps prevent pathogens from invading your skin.5 Talk about some sweet benefits!

Oats:

Oats are the all-star of this recipe, because they do so much. Their first task is to gently exfoliate the skin, scrubbing away layers of dry, dead skin cells that may have built up over the winter months.

The second purpose of the oats is to protect and nourish the skin. You see, oats contain something called “polysaccharides” – a type of carbohydrate. And when you combine polysaccharides with liquid – coconut oil and honey, for example – they can work to protect your skin and help reduce moisture loss.6

Oats also contain phenols, which are naturally-occurring, organic compounds. These phenols work to soothe irritated skin.7 So, if your skin is majorly chapped or irritated by winter winds, phenols might just be your best friend.

Essential Oils:

The fun part of this homemade facial scrub? Choosing essential oils! Here are essential oils you can try, based on the benefits you want:Facial Scrub | Princeton Nutrients

  • Energy: lemon, grapefruit, peppermint, basil
  • Stress relief: lavender, vetiver, cedarwood, frankincense
  • Positive outlook: geranium, sandalwood, bergamot
  • Glowing skin: geranium, patchouli, ylang-ylang
  • Antioxidant Boost: oregano, rosemary, sage

Got all the ingredients? Let’s get to mixing!

DIY FACIAL SCRUB RECIPE

Ingredients:

¼ cup uncooked oats
⅛ cup honey
1 tablespoon coconut oil
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 to 4 drops essential oil

Instructions:
  • Pour the oats into a food processor, and pulse until they’re broken down. You don’t want the oats to become too fine a powder – they’ll lose their exfoliating power.
  • Pour your oats into a bowl, and combine with honey, coconut oil, olive oil, and essential oils. Mix until well blended.
  • After washing your face, apply the mixture, and gently massage for 60 seconds.
  • Now, to get the full skin-protecting benefits of the oats, leave on for 5 to 10 minutes. This will ensure your skin gets a good chance to soak in all those good nutrients.
  • Rinse with lukewarm water, and pat your face dry.

A DIY Facial Scrub Puts A Spring In Your Step

It’s only a matter of time before winter weather transforms into something a little more … tolerable. But when it comes to refreshing your skin? There’s no time like the present. For a complexion that’s moisturized, soothed, glowing, and protected – give this facial scrub a try. So long, winter skin!

For more health tips, keep reading here:
4 Tips For Improving Your Sleep Quality (Every Night)
Massage: Luxury or Therapy?
10 Ways to Increase Your Good Cholesterol (HDL)


Sources
1.https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dry-skin/symptoms-causes/syc-20353885
2.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15724344
3.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4980102/
4.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18429773
5.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24305429
6.https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-3-319-03751-6_64-1
7.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17373175

Drink A Gallon of Water a Day to Lose Weight (does it work?!)

You might think drinking a gallon of water a day – 128 ounces – would be incredibly difficult to do. After all, that would be 16 eight-ounce glasses of water. But if you spread it throughout the day, you’ll probably find that it’s actually not that hard.

And there’s a growing amount of evidence that doing so may help you cut calories and lose weight as a result.

Here’s what the science says regarding drinking water and dropping pounds.

How Water Can Help You Burn Calories

water burns caloriesResearch indicates that drinking water can help you burn calories and stay hydrated. It increases your “resting energy expenditure,” which basically means the amount of calories you burn without exercise.1 One study showed that an adult’s resting energy expenditure increases by as much as 30 percent for a 10-minute time period after consuming water.2

But the benefits aren’t limited to adults. According to the results of another study, obese children increased their resting energy expenditure up to 25 percent more after they consumed cold water.3

Another study showed that overweight women who drank as little as 34 ounces of water a day lost about four pounds more than women who didn’t drink water. And these women didn’t exercise. The only lifestyle change they made was to consume more water. The same study indicates that people burn about 23 calories for each 17 ounces of water they drink. This can definitely add up over time.4

Other studies show that people who drink water can substantially reduce their percentage of body fat.5

Reducing Your Appetite

There is evidence that some people who drink a glass of water before mealtime aren’t as hungry. This is primarily the case for adults who are either middle-aged or senior citizens.6 Older adults who drink water before a meal could lose as much as four pounds in three months, according to one study. Compared to a group of participants who didn’t increase their water intake, a group of obese middle-aged people lost more than 40 percent more weight when drinking water before each meal.7

And drinking extra water before main meals may also have weight loss benefits. In one study, researchers found that obese women who drank water before eating breakfast, lunch, and dinner saw a nearly 15 percent reduction in the amount of calories they ingested.8

Lowering Your Intake of Calories

glass of water

If you like to have a sugary soft drink with meals, that’s a lot of extra, empty calories. Try drinking a glass of water instead. Water is calorie-free. According to the results of a study, people who usually drink water with each meal consume as much as 10 percent fewer calories at mealtime than those who don’t.9 Over the long term, drinking water instead of soda with your meal can go a long way toward helping you avoid gaining weight.10

There is also evidence that putting bottled water in your child’s lunch box each day could help them avoid becoming obese.11 Schools in two German cities implemented a program aimed at reducing obesity rates. Water fountains were installed in 17 schools, and children were educated on the importance of consuming more water. After one year, according to the results, the children’s obesity risk was reduced by 31 percent.12

How Much Should You Drink?

Drinking a gallon of water a day could help if you’re trying to cut weight. But the amount of water different people need often varies. If, for example, you exercise a great deal, you might need more than someone who largely lives a sedentary lifestyle.13

Other Benefits of Drinking Water

If you don’t stay hydrated, you run the risk of suffering many different types of health issues. For example, studies show that water could help reduce symptoms in people who are dehydrated and suffer headaches.14 And carbonated water may help people suffering from constipation and upset stomach.15

There is also evidence that consuming water could help lower the risk of a recurrence of kidney stones. The reason is that water helps increase the volume of urine that moves through the kidneys. This, in turn, dilutes the amount of minerals and reduces the chance that they will crystallize and form stones.16

The Final Word

As you can see, there is a great deal of solid scientific proof that drinking several ounces of water per day can help you in many ways. Water consumption may help you lose weight, but it also provides additional benefits as well. Not sold? Start out with a few extra glasses of water before your big meals, and see if you find yourself eating less. By adding a gallon of water a day to your routine, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier new year.

Learn More:

26 Beauty & Health Benefits of Drinking Hot Water

Do Calories Matter? (the truth revealed in regards to weight loss)


Sources
1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661958
2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17519319
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21750519
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18787524
5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25097411
6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17228036
7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661958
8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18589036
9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20796216
10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23318721
11. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2013/06/26/ajcn.112.055061
12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19336356
13. http://ajpregu.physiology.org/content/ajpregu/early/2002/08/08/ajpregu.00365.2002.full.pdf
14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14979888
15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12352219
16. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD004292.pub3/full

Benefits of Honey Lemon Water (And a Simple Recipe)

Lemon and honey blend beautifully together. This powerful combo not only tastes great – it also delivers a lot of health benefits. So if you’re a fan of lemon or honey, putting them together is pure, delicious magic.

Here are just a few reasons why you should consider getting more lemon and honey in your diet. Plus, I’ve included a simple recipe for honey lemon water so you can stay refreshed all day long.

Lemon Juice Benefits

Honey Lemon Water | Princeton NutrientsLemon juice is rich in vitamin C, which can help strengthen the immune system. This may help your body do a better job of fighting off infections, like the common cold.1 

Research indicates that lemons also help support cardiovascular health. One study involving a group of 101 women showed that regular lemon intake, when combined with a daily walking regimen, could help reduce blood pressure.2

It also suggests that citrus fruits, including lemons, provide other benefits as well. According to one study, these fruits help fight allergies, as well as harmful microbes. They may also help ensure the brain functions as it should.3

Benefits of Honey

A lot of people like to add honey to food or drinks as a natural sweetener. And this is a smart thing to do. The reason is that honey is different from processed sugar in that it doesn’t lead to a sudden “sugar high” and then a crash.4 Honey also helps protect the body from infections caused by harmful bacteria.5 

There is even scientific evidence showing that honey –Honey Lemon Water | Princeton Nutrients

  • Helps wounds heal faster
  • Helps protect the body against fungal infections
  • May help provide protection from diseases of the gastrointestinal tract6

A Dynamic Duo

As you can see, lemon and honey provide powerful health benefits separately. When you combine the two in a drink, like honey lemon water, the benefits only get better. Here are just a few examples:

Body detoxification –

The vitamin C in lemons helps your body produce glutathione, an antioxidant that helps inhibit some of the toxins that can cause major problems.7 Honey lemon water also acts as a diuretic, which helps the body cleanse itself of toxins.8

Aids in digestion –

Lemon juice helps boost the production of gastric acid in the stomach, which may aid digestion, particularly if you have certain diseases.9 Honey, meanwhile, acts as a prebiotic.

Prebiotics act as a food source for probiotics – beneficial bacteria that help promote good digestive health.10 Prebiotics have even been shown to help with weight loss. According to one study, a group of obese children who didn’t take prebiotic supplements gained nearly three times the weight of another group that did take prebiotics.11

Promotes skin health –

Because the ingredients in honey lemon water have antioxidant properties, this means they may help inhibit the development of free radicals. Free radicals are harmful molecules that can damage cells and tissues. Free radicals play a large role in causing wrinkles and age spots.12

Making Honey Lemon Water

It’s extremely fast and easy to make your own honey lemon water. Whether you’re looking for help with your weight loss program, you have a sore throat, or you just want to enjoy the many health benefits, you’ll find it well worth your time.

All you need to do is add a tablespoon of raw honey and a tablespoon-and-a-half of lemon juice to a glass filled with water. Your body will absorb the nutrients faster if the water is at room temperature.13

Honey Lemon Water | Princeton Nutrients

Some people like to add a little“zip” to their honey water by adding ingredients such as cinnamon, or even cayenne pepper. Research indicates that cayenne pepper helps inhibit the secretion of acid in the stomach. This might help to prevent certain digestive problems.14

The Bottom Line

As you can see, honey lemon water can deliver a lot of health benefits you might not have known possible. It may help with digestion, with weight loss, and it might help give your skin a glow, too.

However, before you start drinking honey water with lemon on a daily basis, talk to your doctor. While there are many benefits to this incredible drink, it’s important you and your doctor make sure it’s completely safe for your body.  

Learn More:

(NEWS): Eat Your Fruits and Veggies — Your Mental Health Might Depend on It

The Healing Power of Turmeric (+ 2 recipes to get more in your diet!)

3 Detox Drink Recipes (that actually taste delicious!)


Sources
1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19263912
2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4003767
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690266
4. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317728.php
5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3042689
6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3758027
7. https://asu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/vitamin-c-elevates-red-blood-cell-glutathione-in-healthy-adults
8. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1995764517310052
9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8200147
10. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/medicinal-uses-of-honey-0974-8369-1000276.php?aid=67616
11. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607123949.htm
12. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/86/4/1225.long
13. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/03/14/why-you-should-drink-water-first-thing-every-day/99123938
14.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621751

The Secret To Beating Jet Lag (5 simple tips)

Jet lag: Whether you’re a frequent flier or a one-time vacationer, it can hit you hard as you travel through different time zones. Whether you call it circadian rhythm disorder or simply jet lag, the result is real – a crushing fatigue that leaves you utterly exhausted. Day seems like night. Night seems like day. You’re disoriented, and you want nothing more than to sleep when you finally reach your destination.

Is there anything that you can do to help you avoid jet lag, or at least help your body get over it?

Yes. But first, you have to understand how jet lag works.

What is Jet Lag?

In a nutshell, jet lag is a disruption to the body’s circadian rhythm, or internal clock. Your internal clock tells you when to go to bed and when to get up. But when you travel to another time zone, your body may struggle to adjust, because it’s so used to your time zone at home. The more time zones you cross, the higher the chances you’ll have to deal with jet lag.1

Symptoms of jet lag include:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Gastrointestinal issues, including diarrhea or constipationu2

Since your sleep patterns have been disturbed, you might also be extremely drowsy. But some people have the opposite symptoms, finding it very hard to get to sleep. You might also experience mood changes and an overall sense that you just don’t feel well.3

Thankfully, jet lag is a temporary condition that clears up on its own. However, it can take some people a few days to recover. Generally, for each time zone you cross, it will take a day to get over the effects. For some odd reason, if you travel west to east, it usually takes longer to recover.4

How to Beat Jet Lag – Minimizing Your Symptoms

stop jet lag tips

Hopping from one time zone to the next can certainly be exciting, especially if you’re traveling for pleasure. But you don’t want to feel lousy when you land; snoozing on the plane can help avoid this groggy feeling. Here are some things you can do to help minimize jet lag symptoms:

1. Consider melatonin.

Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone that helps regulate our sleep, but it’s also available in supplement form. It may also be an effective way to deal with the effects of jet lag. Melatonin may help offset the effects of your body’s internal clock being disturbed. While side effects don’t usually occur with melatonin, some people experience nausea, dizziness, a loss of appetite, and headaches.5 Never take melatonin, or any other type of supplement, without first talking to your doctor.

2. Gradually change your sleep patterns before the trip.

You might find it easier for your body to adjust to jet lag by easing into a new sleep routine about a week or so before you leave. For example, if your trip will take you to the east, try going to bed an hour or two earlier than normal. If you’re travelling west, gradually shift your bedtime an hour or two later. Since you probably sleep better in your own bed, the more you try to adjust before you leave, the better prepared you’ll be to sleep in the new time zone.

3. Be careful when choosing your seat.

first class seating
If you can afford seats in business or first class, take them. The seats are usually wider and more comfortable. You might be able to sleep better, because seats may recline further. But if your budget won’t allow for first class, you can still find a seat that will reduce your discomfort. For example, many airlines have a “premium economy” section with slightly wider seats that provide more legroom. This may make stretching out easier. Also, try to stay away from seats near the lavatories or the galley, because they’re high-traffic areas that may make it more difficult for you to get to sleep.

4. Watch your alcohol intake.

While a drink might make it easier for you to get to sleep, it won’t be high-quality sleep. Drinking alcohol can lead to dehydration. And this effect becomes even more pronounced when you’re drinking at a high altitude.6 You might get to sleep, but you’ll more than likely feel extremely groggy when you wake up. Alcohol can also exacerbate problems such as snoring, further interrupting your sleep (and the sleep of your fellow plane passengers).

5. Lighten up on mental stimulation.

You might be tempted to use your tablet, laptop, or cell phone to help kill time during your flight. But you should turn them off about an hour before you plan on getting some sleep on the plane. These devices emit blue light. The blue light from these gadgets can actually make it harder to get the rest you need.7 Try reading a magazine or newspaper instead right before trying to get some shut-eye.

Still Struggling?

If you’re a frequent traveler and you’re struggling to get over jet lag, consider seeing your doctor. Melatonin might be beneficial, but you might need other medications or therapies.

The Takeaway

Jet lag takes a toll on the body, but there are ways you can combat it. Putting a plan in place before you get on that plane can greatly increase your chances of bouncing back faster. Bon voyage!

Learn More:

A Bad Memory May Actually Be A Good Thing (here’s why)

This Simple Sitting Test Can Tell You A Lot About Your Health


Sources
1. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/165339.php
2. https://www.medicinenet.com/jet_lag/article.htm#what_are_other_symptoms_and_signs_of_jet_lag
3. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/opinion/sunday/can-sleep-deprivation-cure-depression.html
4. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/jet-lag/basics/definition/con-20032662
5. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/jet-lag/basics/alternative-medicine/con-20032662
6. https://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewbender/2014/04/08/beating-jet-lag-8-ways-youre-doing-it-wrong-and-how-to-do-it-right/#1f8be4e91843
7. https://www.livescience.com/53874-blue-light-sleep.html